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Limousine – Ranch-to-table carnivore heaven

SC 21/04/2021


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Farm-to-table has become a mantra in the restaurant business in recent years, but in Israel’s lower Galilee, the concept has been a tradition for the last two decades. Ranch-to-table is the tried-and-true modus operandi of Limousine, the acclaimed meat restaurant that raises its own cattle, in addition to being suppliers of prime beef for some of the country’s most prestigious fine dining establishments.
From the moment one enters Limousine, one is impressed by the butcher shop and delicatessen on the left and the spacious, modern dining area on the right. The handsome light wooden furnishings are complemented by extremely comfortable seating, with views of not only the semi-open kitchen and grilling station but also the stunning landscape of the Jezreel Valley visible through floor-to-ceiling panoramic windows.
The service is swift and attentive from the start, as menus and the wine list are quickly brought to the table. While all of this material is only in Hebrew, the owner assured me that most staff are able to assist in English – an assertion that is backed up by the English-language website that serves as a good introduction. 
The cocktail list is more than adequate, containing both classics and a few specialty drinks (NIS 38). The barman recommended one of his newest concoctions, as yet unnamed: a blend of whiskey, Aperol and citrus juices, garnished with fresh strawberries and a large sprig of mint. Ordinarily, I am not a fan of either whiskey or Aperol, but this mixture was tasty and refreshing.
The food menu consists of: First Courses (NIS 28-62), Salads (an untitled subsection under first courses, NIS 35-45), Children’s menu (NIS 49-54), Meats (NIS 69-250) and several individual dishes comprising Grilled Fish (NIS 92), Vegetarian Hamburger (NIS 65) and Sides (NIS 18; a meat main course includes one free side dish). Not surprisingly for a restaurant specializing in meat, vegan options are few and far between, although gluten-free is less of a problem.
Even among steakhouses, the selection of first courses is highly unusual: Of the nine dishes itemized, eight are meat and only one is vegetarian/vegan. The three salads also fall in this latter category.

IN ACCORDANCE with our waitress’s recommendations, we began with the Cubed Veal Filet, stir-fried in butter and mushrooms, and served atop a layer of peppercorn cream sauce. I don’t think I have ever used the adjective “succulent” to describe an appetizer, but that is precisely the most appropriate modifier for the tender morsels of veal swimming in perfectly seasoned heavy cream sauce, which we mopped up to the very last drop with the house baguette. 
Next was the Butcher’s Cut, with which I am familiar as a main course, but rarely as an entrée. This was a small portion of thinly sliced steak grilled expertly to a reddish-pink interior with a delicate crust, and served with a small pot of warm, liquidy chimichurri. Just like our previous dish, we would have been perfectly happy to order either of these two as a main course. 
Even though many the main courses were the usual suspects when it comes to the kinds of steak, deciding among the 11 options (different cuts and sizes) was still not that easy. The waitress came to my immediate rescue again when she informed us of that evening’s special: New York Strip – a sirloin steak on the bone. This is a variation I rarely encounter in Israel, so I seized the opportunity.
My companion, meanwhile, selected the entrecote, which comes in two generous sizes: 350 or 450 grams. This juicy slab of well-marbled boneless rib eye was as good as you will get anywhere in the country. 
My New York Strip turned out to be the thickest sirloin I have ever seen, let alone tasted. It was particularly lean, so the experience was of pure beef indulgence. There was simply too much to finish in one sitting, so I was able to enjoy it just as much the next day at home – including gnawing voraciously at the sizable bone. 
The side dishes paired with the steaks also lived up to the restaurant’s high standards: the French fries were like thick McDonald’s – crisp on the outside, fluffy on the inside. Still, it was the mashed potatoes that took the prize. Served piping hot from the oven in their own baking pan, the smooth and creamy purée was enriched with milk and butter, and whipped to golden brown peaks. 
Finally, we did not pick Limousine for its desserts, but the separate dessert menu surprised us with its description of five tempting last courses (NIS 45-47), prepared by the restaurant’s dedicated pastry chef. My companion’s Pavlova was a decadent tower of shards of sweet meringue layered with fresh blueberries and strawberries, while my Mascarpone Cream with Limoncello was a parfait of the sweet cream with berries, accompanied by a shot glass of the Italian lemon liqueur. Mixing them together resulted in a harmonious symphony of rich extravagance – and a welcome finale to an unforgettable meal. 
Limousine 
Not Kosher 
14 Horesh HaAlonim St., Ramat Yishai 
Phone: (04) 953-3173
The writer was a guest of the restaurant. 

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Co-Host for Coffee Mouth Scarecrow Show. Retired NAVY Chief/Flag Writer Psalms 118:24 This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.

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  • Home
  • keyboard_arrow_right Food & Recipes
  • keyboard_arrow_right Limousine – Ranch-to-table carnivore heaven

Food & Recipes

Limousine – Ranch-to-table carnivore heaven

SC 21/04/2021 2


Background
share close
Farm-to-table has become a mantra in the restaurant business in recent years, but in Israel’s lower Galilee, the concept has been a tradition for the last two decades. Ranch-to-table is the tried-and-true modus operandi of Limousine, the acclaimed meat restaurant that raises its own cattle, in addition to being suppliers of prime beef for some of the country’s most prestigious fine dining establishments.
From the moment one enters Limousine, one is impressed by the butcher shop and delicatessen on the left and the spacious, modern dining area on the right. The handsome light wooden furnishings are complemented by extremely comfortable seating, with views of not only the semi-open kitchen and grilling station but also the stunning landscape of the Jezreel Valley visible through floor-to-ceiling panoramic windows.
The service is swift and attentive from the start, as menus and the wine list are quickly brought to the table. While all of this material is only in Hebrew, the owner assured me that most staff are able to assist in English – an assertion that is backed up by the English-language website that serves as a good introduction. 
The cocktail list is more than adequate, containing both classics and a few specialty drinks (NIS 38). The barman recommended one of his newest concoctions, as yet unnamed: a blend of whiskey, Aperol and citrus juices, garnished with fresh strawberries and a large sprig of mint. Ordinarily, I am not a fan of either whiskey or Aperol, but this mixture was tasty and refreshing.
The food menu consists of: First Courses (NIS 28-62), Salads (an untitled subsection under first courses, NIS 35-45), Children’s menu (NIS 49-54), Meats (NIS 69-250) and several individual dishes comprising Grilled Fish (NIS 92), Vegetarian Hamburger (NIS 65) and Sides (NIS 18; a meat main course includes one free side dish). Not surprisingly for a restaurant specializing in meat, vegan options are few and far between, although gluten-free is less of a problem.
Even among steakhouses, the selection of first courses is highly unusual: Of the nine dishes itemized, eight are meat and only one is vegetarian/vegan. The three salads also fall in this latter category.

IN ACCORDANCE with our waitress’s recommendations, we began with the Cubed Veal Filet, stir-fried in butter and mushrooms, and served atop a layer of peppercorn cream sauce. I don’t think I have ever used the adjective “succulent” to describe an appetizer, but that is precisely the most appropriate modifier for the tender morsels of veal swimming in perfectly seasoned heavy cream sauce, which we mopped up to the very last drop with the house baguette. 
Next was the Butcher’s Cut, with which I am familiar as a main course, but rarely as an entrée. This was a small portion of thinly sliced steak grilled expertly to a reddish-pink interior with a delicate crust, and served with a small pot of warm, liquidy chimichurri. Just like our previous dish, we would have been perfectly happy to order either of these two as a main course. 
Even though many the main courses were the usual suspects when it comes to the kinds of steak, deciding among the 11 options (different cuts and sizes) was still not that easy. The waitress came to my immediate rescue again when she informed us of that evening’s special: New York Strip – a sirloin steak on the bone. This is a variation I rarely encounter in Israel, so I seized the opportunity.
My companion, meanwhile, selected the entrecote, which comes in two generous sizes: 350 or 450 grams. This juicy slab of well-marbled boneless rib eye was as good as you will get anywhere in the country. 
My New York Strip turned out to be the thickest sirloin I have ever seen, let alone tasted. It was particularly lean, so the experience was of pure beef indulgence. There was simply too much to finish in one sitting, so I was able to enjoy it just as much the next day at home – including gnawing voraciously at the sizable bone. 
The side dishes paired with the steaks also lived up to the restaurant’s high standards: the French fries were like thick McDonald’s – crisp on the outside, fluffy on the inside. Still, it was the mashed potatoes that took the prize. Served piping hot from the oven in their own baking pan, the smooth and creamy purée was enriched with milk and butter, and whipped to golden brown peaks. 
Finally, we did not pick Limousine for its desserts, but the separate dessert menu surprised us with its description of five tempting last courses (NIS 45-47), prepared by the restaurant’s dedicated pastry chef. My companion’s Pavlova was a decadent tower of shards of sweet meringue layered with fresh blueberries and strawberries, while my Mascarpone Cream with Limoncello was a parfait of the sweet cream with berries, accompanied by a shot glass of the Italian lemon liqueur. Mixing them together resulted in a harmonious symphony of rich extravagance – and a welcome finale to an unforgettable meal. 
Limousine 
Not Kosher 
14 Horesh HaAlonim St., Ramat Yishai 
Phone: (04) 953-3173
The writer was a guest of the restaurant. 

Source

Rate it
Author

SC

Co-Host for Coffee Mouth Scarecrow Show. Retired NAVY Chief/Flag Writer Psalms 118:24 This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.

list Archive

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Previous post

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