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Cookware, gold coin shed light on life in Ramat Hasharon 1500 years ago

CM 18/08/2021 2


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Cooking utensils, jars, a large wine press and a gold coin dating back to the Byzantine period and other installations from the Early Muslim period have been unearthed in Ramat Hasharon, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday.
 The gold coin unearthed in an excavation, bearing an engraving to mark ownership (credit: Amir Gorzalczany, Israel Antiquities Authority) The gold coin unearthed in an excavation, bearing an engraving to mark ownership (credit: Amir Gorzalczany, Israel Antiquities Authority)
The city, just a few kilometers north of Tel Aviv, was established in 1922. However, the area was settled also in the antiquities, as confirmed by the archaeological remains.

 “This is the first archaeological excavation ever conducted at the site, and only part of it was previously identified in an archaeological field survey,” IAA Tel Aviv District archaeologist Diego Barkan said. “The Israel Antiquities Authority views this as an excellent opportunity to integrate the ancient remains into plans for the future municipal park.”
The remains offered a glimpse of the daily life of the inhabitants of the land.
“The excavation unearthed evidence of agricultural-industrial activity at the site during the Byzantine period – about 1,500 years ago. Among other finds, we discovered a large winepress paved with a mosaic as well as plastered installations and the foundations of a large structure that may have been used as a warehouse or even a farmstead,” said Dr. Yoav Arbel, Director of the excavation on behalf of the IAA.
 The winepress unveiled in Ramat Hasharon (credit: YOLI SCHWARTZ/IAA) The winepress unveiled in Ramat Hasharon (credit: YOLI SCHWARTZ/IAA)
“Inside the buildings and installations, we found many fragments of storage jars and cooking pots that were evidently used by laborers working in the fields here,” he added. “We also recovered stone mortars and millstones that were used to grind wheat and barley and probably also to crush herbs and medicinal plants. Most of the stone implements are made of basalt from the Golan Heights and Galilee.”
The artifacts were discovered during a salvage excavation prior to the construction of a new neighborhood. According to Israeli law, a salvage excavation has to accompany any construction project.
The archaeologists also came across an individual gold coin minted in 638 or 639 BCE under the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius, the ruler who lost the area of the Middle East, including modern Israel, Syria and Egypt first to the Persians and then to the Arabs.
The coin features the emperor with his two sons on one side, and the Golgotha, where according Cristian tradition Jesus was crucified, on the other.
“The coin encapsulates fascinating data on the decline of Byzantine rule in the country and contemporary historical events, such as the Persian invasion and the emergence of Islam, and provides information on Christian and pagan symbolism and the local population who lived here,” said Dr. Robert Kool, head of the IAA Numismatics Department.
The coin also bears an inscription scratched in a second moment on it in Greek, and possibly in Arabic, likely featuring the name of the owner.
In addition, a bronze chain to suspend chandeliers was found – artifacts that were usually used in churches.
Some installation from the Early Islamic periods were also uncovered.

Source: Jerusalem Post

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The host of Coffee Mouth Scare Crow Show and CEO of 452 Impact, Inc. Here is food for thought. Romans 6:23 "For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord." John 3:16 "For God so love ed the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him shall be saved."

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